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Your Choice Of Instagram Filter Can Reveal If You're Depressed

Pascale Day
by Pascale Day Published on 26 August 2016

Instagram is typically used for pictures of your breakfast, cute kittens and #OOTDs but a new study suggests your choice of filter can be an indication of whether you're showing signs of being depressed.

We all have a favourite filter. For some, the retro hues of Valencia win every time. For others, the vivid colouring of Clarendon might be their jam. But it turns out that, if you're more likely to edit your pic with darker hues, it could be a sign that you're depressed.

A study undertaken by researchers Andrew Reece of Harvard University and Chris Danforth of University of Vermont looked at around 44,000 Insta snaps of 166 volunteers. Each participant completed a survey on clinical depression and handed over their Instagram names. A link was discovered between a participant's mood and the colour, brightness and subjects used in each image.

The study indicated that snaps that were darker, with more blues and greys, predicted depression and those who favoured monochrome filters like Inkwell were also found to be susceptible to the illness.

And while Andrew and Chris hope that their research will pave the way for Instagram analysis to be a viable way of looking for mental illness, we're not so sure yet. What if we just love Inkwell? I mean, we all look hot with a B&W filter, right? But, if this is a legit way to detect signs of mental illness, who are we to doubt it? Considering that Instagram users share an average of 70 million photos each day, and is considered the most important social networking site among teens, it could be the perfect way to get through to the younger generation.

What do you think of the study? Let us know! @sofeminineUK

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