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Pregnancy guide

3rd week of pregnancy

Week 3, Mum's health: You're unaware that you're pregnant, but fertilisation has taken place. You probably won't feel affected by the changes taking place yet; it's only later, when your period is late and when you've taken tests, that your pregnancy is confirmed...

Week 3, baby: Fertilisation (when a sperm penetrates an egg) takes place in the Fallopian tubes, then the fertilised egg (ovum) moves slowly towards the uterus (womb). Towards the end of this week, the fertilised egg embeds itself in the lining of the uterus, this is known as implantation...

Week 3, advice: If you smoke or drink, now's the time to quit cigarettes and alcohol for the sake of your baby's health. Smoking puts your unborn baby's life in danger It's never too late to quit, even if you're already pregnant...

4th week of pregnancy

Week 4, Mum's health: On average, a woman's menstrual cycles last 28 days... but with some variations! With your period now late (if you have regular cycles), you will start asking yourself questions. 4-5 days after the expected date of your period, you can buy a pregnancy test to find out if you're pregnant...

Week 4, baby: At the beginning of its second week of life, the egg starts to embed itself in the lining of the uterus (this is called implantation). A very large number of cells multiply. Certain cells soon start to "specialise": some move towards the edge, other larger ones stay in the middle...

Week 4, advice: You're still not aware that you're pregnant. Perhaps you just feel a bit more tired than usual. The start of a so-called "normal" pregnancy shouldn't mean a radical change to your regular activities, but there are a few precautions to take...

5th week of pregnancy

Week 5, Mum's health: You still haven't had your period, which was due around 10 days ago. You can take a pregnancy test (if you haven't already done so). This test measures a hormone called hCG. The levels of this hormone increase regularly in your body...

Week 5, baby: On the 16th day, the egg is almost 3mm long and more deeply embedded in the mucous membrane that lines the inside of the uterus. The egg makes contact with the uterus' blood vessels in order to provide the egg with the nutritional elements that are essential for its development...

Week 5, advice: One of the biggest enemies of mums-to-be, especially at the start of pregnancy, is tiredness. During the first few months, it's not unusual to feel an uncontrollable urge to sleep. This is normal, firstly...

6th week of pregnancy

Week 6, Mum's health: Your uterus starts to get bigger and reaches the size of a clementine. The signs of pregnancy are now quite apparent: swollen, sometimes painful breasts; darker and enlarged nipples; increased vaginal discharge; tiredness that sometimes hits you in the middle of the day, etc...

Week 6, baby: The embryo is getting bigger and taking shape as the trunk and head form. The rough outline of certain organs start to appear. The nervous system is one of the first systems to develop. It begins growing in an inward-curved area (the neural groove) then develops into a tube (the neural tube)...

Week 6, advice: It's not unusual to hear friends, family and books blame hormones for your mood swings. Your up-and-down emotions can be a result of hormonal changes, but they can also be down to psychological changes and fears related to your new situation...

7th week of pregnancy

Week 7, Mum's health: The issue of weight will start to affect you. Some women worry that they haven't put any weight on. Don't panic: physiological changes can sometimes interfere with your weight. Loss of appetite, a heightened sense of smell, nausea and tiredness are all factors that can also impede weight gain...

Week 7, baby: The embryo continues to develop and is almost 1cm long by the end of the 5th week. It's now growing at around 1mm a day! The organs continue to take shape, including the eyes. The "head end" of the neural tube is significantly curved forwards...

Week 7, advice: 50 to 80% of mums-to-be suffer from morning sickness during the first trimester. Reassuringly, it won't last throughout your entire pregnancy and generally stops sometime between the 16th and 20th week since your last menstrual period...

8th week of pregnancy

Week 8, Mum's health: Your doctor or midwife will be paying attention to certain medical guidelines: your booking appointment should ideally be carried out at around this time. In addition to sending you for blood tests and scans, they will be keeping a close eye on your health, starting with your weight...

Week 8, baby: The embryo measures around 15mm in length. The outline of the spinal column appears. Other organs start to take form and become more individual during the second month of pregnancy. The digestive system gradually forms with the oesophagus...

Week 8, advice: It's normal to suffer from irritated gums during pregnancy. In fact, gingivitis affects 25% of pregnant women before the 5th month of pregnancy. It is caused by an increase in hormone levels, and leaves gums swollen, red and bleeding...

9th week of pregnancy

Week 9, Mum's health: Slight bleeding or spotting can sometimes occur during the first weeks of pregnancy. Sometimes it happens when you would normally have had your period. If blood loss is not heavy, doesn't last, and isn't accompanied by any other specific symptom (pain...

Week 9, baby: Your baby's organs continue to develop. The parts of the brain and principal nerves begin to form. For its development, the embryo gets all the nourishment it needs from its mother's blood. The nutrients are made up of protein...

Week 9, advice: It's normal to be constipated during pregnancy because hormonal changes (notably progesterone) cause muscular fibres to relax, reducing intestinal contractions. Then, as the months pass, the size of your uterus impedes digestion...

10th week of pregnancy

Week 10, Mum's health: The unpleasant symptoms of the first few weeks of pregnancy (nausea, vomiting, etc) tend to gradually disappear, in theory at least. You may feel the need to urinate more often than usual. This is perfectly normal...

Week 10, baby: The embryo weighs around 10 grams and measures 3 to 4cm in length. Its cells have multiplied enormously and its body now has millions of cells. The embryo floats in the amniotic fluid which protects it from shocks...

Week 10, advice: Should you wait a few months before announcing your special news? When is the right moment to share your happiness? People often say 'wait three months,' but it's really up to you. If you're worried about miscarrying...

11th week of pregnancy

Week 11, Mum's health: In theory, you should be suffering less from the symptoms that perhaps spoilt your first few weeks of pregnancy. Depending on the results of your blood test, you may have been given certain recommendations...

Week 11, baby: The embryo weighs about 12g. The brain and nervous system continue to develop. The two cerebral hemispheres begin to be distinguishable. The nerve cells that will become neurones gradually connect with each other to form a network...

Week 11, advice: Need to travel? During your pregnancy, your body will be going through a lot of changes, but unless you have a high-risk pregnancy there's no reason why you shouldn't travel. Just bear in mind the restrictions your pregnancy imposes...

12th week of pregnancy

Week 12, Mum's health: You will have regular check-ups throughout your pregnancy. As a rule, the first takes place before the end of the third month. You may also be offered the first ultrasound scan there and then if your midwife is based at the local hospital...

Week 12, baby: By the third month, the embryo is settled in the uterus. Its development continues: the arms and legs take shape, and the fingers and toes start to take definition. The sensory and motor nervous systems start to develop...

Week 12, advice: By now, your morning sickness should have passed and your appetite returned. Be careful not to put on too much weight! Weight gain during pregnancy varies a lot from one woman to the next. The average weight gain is from 9 to 13kg...

13th week of pregnancy

Week 13, Mum's health: The placenta is developing. It plays a major role for the embryo as it allows all the transfer between mother and child to take place. It filters nutrients and various substances, allowing some through and stopping others...

Week 13, baby: The embryo continues to develop. Its limbs are also well developed and the fingers are already distinguishable! But it's the head end in particular that becomes very important in relation to the rest of the body...

Week 13, advice: 50% of couples gradually stop having sex during pregnancy. Only 10% retain their usual level of activity from start to finish, yet doctors recommend a healthy sex life during pregnancy. There's no risk of hurting the baby...

14th week of pregnancy

Week 14, Mum's health: Do you cut the rind off cheese before eating or cooking it? You need to do so, because certain foods (including cheese rind) are not recommended because of the risk of contracting infections caused by...

Week 14, baby: The fetus weighs around 45g and is about 10cm long. Its arms, legs, hands and feet are very distinct. The nervous system is developed and the muscles are forming so the fetus begins to move. The movements are very small but quite sudden...

Week 14, advice: Being pregnant may entitle you to certain benefits such as Statutory Maternity Pay (SMP), Maternity Allowance (MA), Surestart Maternity Grant, Health in Pregnancy Grant, Tax Credits, etc. Your entitlement to these benefits will depend on whether you work and if you do...

15th week of pregnancy

Week 15, Mum's health: Your body continues to go through certain changes. The mask of pregnancy (chloasma) generally occurs from the 4th month onwards. These dark marks that appear, which can make you look like you haven't washed properly, can form above the lips, on the chin, nose and/or forehead...

Week 15, baby: The fetus measures just under 12cm long. It still has 40cm to grow between now and the birth. The volume and weight of the fetus are increasing in particular. During the fourth month, the fetus will weigh around 60g and the weight will increase about 50-fold by birth...

Week 15, advice: When it comes to clothing, comfort is the keyword. The main point is not to squeeze your body into clothes that are too tight. During the first few weeks, you can still make do with your pre-pregnancy clothes, but over time you'll find that the choice becomes smaller...

16th week of pregnancy

Week 16, Mum's health: Even if you're eating well to nourish your body and your baby, pregnant women are advised to take certain dietary supplements to avoid deficiencies. These supplements can vary depending on the stage of pregnancy...

Week 16, baby: During the fourth month, the fetus' body is covered in a fine layer of downy hair known as lanugo. Some babies have more than others, and some even keep it for a few days after birth. The epidermis, the most superficial layer of the skin, is about to be formed...

Week 16, advice: Bladder infections (or urinary tract infections) are common during pregnancy (around 15% of pregnant women are affected), especially in the last trimester. A bladder infection occurs when urine, which is normally sterile...

17th week of pregnancy

Week 17, Mum's health: The uterus measures about 17cm. It's possible that you may experience some worrying symptoms such as contractions. The first thing to do is speak about these with your doctor or midwife. Note that contractions can occur, but don't necessarily indicate a particular problem...

Week 17, baby: The different organs of the fetus continue to develop. The baby's heart beats around twice as fast as yours. The heart is made up of four chambers. At the top are the atria (the smallest chambers), and...

Week 17, advice: Take care in the sun! You're especially sensitive during pregnant. It's a known fact that exposure to the sun can be harmful, but pregnant women have extra reasons to fear the sun. If you don't want to end up with the 'mask of pregnancy' (chloasma), stay clear of UV rays...

18th week of pregnancy

Week 18, Mum's health: Your bump is fairly round now. You may be finding it difficult to wear your seat belt in the car. By law, all pregnant women must wear seat belts when travelling by car, whether they are in the front or back...

Week 18, baby: During the fourth or fifth month you'll start to feel baby move for the first time... it's a very special, exciting moment, and one you've been waiting for! The first movement can feel different from one woman to the next...

Week 18, advice: The traditional way of preparing for the birth of your child involves learning about the different stages of pregnancy and preparing yourself for the big moment so that you know exactly what you’re going through at every step...

19th week of pregnancy

Week 19, Mum's health: After some potentially difficult months of morning sickness and fatigue, you are now, in theory, entering a more pleasant phase of your pregnancy. Many women feel much better, and it shows! They have found a balance and got their bearings...

Week 19, baby: All of the fetus' organs continue to develop, including the sex organs. At the beginning (at the end of the second and third month of pregnancy), these are quite alike. The forming of testicles or ovaries takes place inside the abdomen...

Week 19, advice: Fundamental hormonal changes take place during pregnancy. Future mums release a hormone, cortisol, which decreases the amount of collagen in the skin and helps to keep skin fibres stretchy. This isn't good news...

20th week of pregnancy

Week 20, Mum's health: You're right to question what kinds of exercise are appropriate. Whether you're athletic or sedentary, you might feel like doing some sort of exercise over the next few weeks. As you've probably guessed, combat/contact sports or SCUBA diving are out of the question...

Week 20, baby: The fetus continues to develop. It now measures around 20cm. Its five fingers and toes are distinct and the nails are beginning to form. The bones of the skeleton are getting bigger. They are currently very flexible, composed mostly of cartilage...

Week 20, advice: For women who have carried babies for 9 months, becoming a mum isn't always easy, but for men it can be even more complicated! Overnight, they have to enter fatherhood and make a place for themselves in the trio...

21th week of pregnancy

Week 21, Mum's health: You continue to get bigger and the top of your uterus reaches your belly button. Continue to control your weight; weight gain is often fairly slow during the first months of pregnancy. It increases towards the end of the fourth month onwards...

Week 21, baby: The fetus' five senses are developing more and more and already beginning to function, in some cases. Taste and smell develop quite early on, which is why the olfactory nerves begin to form from the 10th week of the fetus's development...

Week 21, advice: Pregnancy causes significant hormonal changes that can lead to anxiety and stress. It's important to remain vigilant. Stress has in-utero consequences and significantly increases the risk of premature birth...

22th week of pregnancy

Week 22, Mum's health: You'll be offered a routine scan around the 20th week of pregnancy. This will allow the doctor to look in detail at the baby's organs. If you wish, and if it's possible, you may find out baby's sex at this point...

Week 22, baby: During the fifth month, the fetus grows a lot. It's now 23cm long and weighs over 400g. Its sensory functions become more refined, particularly its sense of taste. The taste buds that correspond to specific sensory receptors become more mature...

Week 22, advice: Looking after your skin Looking after your breasts Under the effect of hormones, your bust will get bigger as your breasts prepare themselves for breastfeeding. You might go up by one or two cup sizes...

23th week of pregnancy

Week 23, Mum's health: To help with some of the symptoms associated with pregnancy, some women turn to alternative medicine. If you decide to try out homeopathy, watch out for preparations with alcohol-based mother tinctures (extracts of the original substances)...

Week 23, baby: The fetus' five senses are gradually developing. During the 5th month, it's highly likely that your baby is already aware of noises. The ears start to take shape at around 8 weeks. Next to the brain, a small bud will isolate itself and grow to make up the neurological elements of the inner ear...

Week 23, advice: Be careful not to gain too much weight! You may be having cravings, which are perfectly normal (even though doctors struggle to understand them), but pregnancy brings new emotions, which can sometimes lead to new eating habits...

24th week of pregnancy

Week 24, Mum's health: As pregnancy advances and your belly becomes rounder and heavier, many women complain of backache from the 6th month onwards, or even sooner. The pain generally occurs in the lower part of the back (near the kidneys) and is often due to poor posture...

Week 24, baby: The fetus weighs around 500g and is about 25cm long. By birth, its weight will have increased six-fold and its length two-fold. It will therefore put on another 2.5kg, or more, which shows how much bigger it will get in the space of just a few weeks...

Week 24, advice: Stay upright! - When standing, keep your feet parallel, relax your shoulders, lengthen your neck and tip your pelvis backwards so that your lower back is as straight as possible. - When sitting, place your legs parallel to the floor...

25th week of pregnancy

Week 25, Mum's health: As the pregnancy advances, you could find yourself suffering from circulation problems which may cause heaviness or pain in the legs, especially at the end of the day, or the appearance (or worsening) of varicose veins...

Week 25, baby: The fetus continues to develop and the organs continue to mature anatomically and physiologically. The endocrine glands, digestive tract, neurological and cardiovascular systems all become more autonomous...

Week 25, advice: Weight gain and pressure from the uterus on the pelvic veins can lead to heavy legs. Insufficient circulation causes discomfort and heaviness in the legs, varicose veins and swelling. First and foremost...

26th week of pregnancy

Week 26, Mum's health: You can now feel your baby move quite a bit. If you want to know more about these movements, you could consider haptonomy. The aim of it is to begin showing your baby affection and protection. In theory, you can start haptonomy once you can feel your baby move...

Week 26, baby: The fetus now weighs almost 700g. Its nervous system continues to develop. Some nerves start to surround themselves with myelin, a fatty substance responsible for the correct conduction of nerve impulses...

Week 26, advice: You might have started feeling practice contractions known as Braxton Hicks. Now is the time to make sure you're taking proper care of yourself. Some women simply need to slow down. Others might have to stop all activity and may be told to rest...

27th week of pregnancy

Week 27, Mum's health: Towards the end of pregnancy, you may begin to experience sleep problems, often due to backache, feeling uncomfortable or too hot. If you're really struggling to sleep, you may want to try to find different ways to help you sleep...

Week 27, baby: The fetus is now 31cm long. Its movements are now quite significant and at times, it feels like it's tossing and turning a lot. It is quite important now that you moniter your baby's movements. If you...

Week 27, advice: Skin During pregnancy, the changes in hormone levels can lead to changes to nearly every part of your body, so you need to adapt your beauty regime and adopt new habits. Your skin becomes drier, more sensitive and intolerant to certain products that up until now it may have tolerated...

28th week of pregnancy

Week 28, Mum's health: It's important to go for regular medical checks because certain complications can arise towards the end of pregnancy such as increased blood pressure or diabetes (know as gestational diabetes) which can create risks for the fetus and yourself...

Week 28, baby: Baby continues to grow and the sensory organs carry on developing. In its liquid environment, baby will be aware of sounds from the beating of your heart to the noise of your intestines and your voice, as well as external noise...

Week 28, advice: The basic activity levels of pregnant women increase by 10%, which soon leads to tiredness and breathlessness. But regular exercise helps the body deal with the stresses and strains it experiences during pregnancy and childbirth...

29th week of pregnancy

Week 29, Mum's health: Some women are afraid of going into labour prematurely and some do show signs that indicate a risk of premature birth (which occurs before the 37th week of gestation i.e. 37 weeks since last menstrual period)...

Week 29, baby: Baby now weighs about 1 kilo, or maybe even a bit more. This means that in the space of just a few weeks, before your advancing due date, your baby's weight will increase around threefold! During this period...

Week 29, advice: The 3rd trimester isn't renowned for being a prime time for sex. You'll be increasingly tired, and although intercourse is still possible, it becomes more uncomfortable because of the size of your bump...

30th week of pregnancy

Week 30, Mum's health: If you wish, you can attend antenatal classes. NHS classes take place in a hospital or health centre whilst private classes are often held in less formal settings or at someone's home. You are encouraged to attend as many classes as possible...

Week 30, baby: Your baby's different organs are developing more and more, while their functions are becoming more specific every day. Even though there have recently been many discoveries about life inside the uterus (through the progress of biological analysis and ultrasound scans...

Week 30, advice: The weight of your bump can lead to an increase in lordosis, or excessive curvature of the lower back. This phenomenon, combined with weight gain and changes in hormone levels, can lead to compression...

31th week of pregnancy

Week 31, Mum's health: Your bump is getting rounder and rounder. A dark vertical line may appear under your navel; this is nothing to worry about and will disappear after birth. Under the influence of pregnancy hormones, all of your tissues, including cartilage and muscle tissue, become softer...

Week 31, baby: Baby's eyes are closed but the eyelids are about to open. Your baby can't see a lot in his/her rather dark environment. The retinas of the eyes begin to mature and will continue to do so right through to the end of your pregnancy and for a few weeks after birth as well...

Week 31, advice: Although it is recommended that your baby sleeps in the same room as you for the first six months following birth, preparing baby's room is still an exciting step. Start giving some thought now to how you're going to decorate it...

32th week of pregnancy

Week 32, Mum's health: The uterus presses and weighs on the bladder, which makes you want to go to the toilet frequently and may even lead to incontinence. If this is the case, you might feel like drinking less to avoid this kind of problem, but that 's not a good idea...

Week 32, baby: Your baby weighs about 1.5kg and is 40cm long. The brain continues to develop, and is protected in the cranium which isn't fully closed up yet. The skull is made up of many bones that join up little by little...

Week 32, advice: As the months pass, your bump becomes rounder and baby's arrival is imminent. It's best to get everything ready in advance so you can dedicate all your time to your baby when you come out of hospital....

33th week of pregnancy

Week 33, Mum's health: Did you know that you can donate blood from your umbilical cord when you give birth? The blood contained within it (and also in the placenta) is rich in stem cells that are particularly useful for treating certain blood diseases and cancers in both children and adults...

Week 33, baby: The fetus usually turns and settles into position ready for labour during the seventh or eighth month (this is known as engagement). There isn't much space in the womb any more, so baby takes up a head-down position and 'engages' in your pelvis...

Week 33, advice: Perhaps you've been prescribed bed rest right up to the end of your pregnancy. If this is the case, unfortunately you have no choice but to take to your bed and stay there. Bed rest is essential if you have a lot of regular contractions...

34th week of pregnancy

Week 34, Mum's health: You'll now start having antenatal appointments every two weeks: at 34, 36, 38 and 41 weeks. Along with routine checks (blood pressure, urine, bump measurement) and antenatal classes, you should be given the chance to talk through your birth plan with your midwife...

Week 34, baby: All baby's organs are now in place. Your baby now needs to gain weight and strength for labour and for life on the outside! From now onwards, baby will grow quickly, gaining around 20 to 30 grams a day...

Week 34, advice: Your baby can take the mother or father's surname, whether you are married or not, although he or she will have to take your surname in the hospital. You have six weeks to register the birth of your baby with the registrar in the town or city where your baby has been born...

35th week of pregnancy

Week 35, Mum's health: Acupuncture is considered by some doctors and midwives to be very beneficial in the latter stages of pregnancy. It can help to treat a number of conditions that arise during pregnancy, including morning sickness, indigestion and constipation...

Week 35, baby: Your baby's heart almost has its final shape now. Cardiac circulation before birth differs from cardiac circulation post-birth because the communication between the left and right parts of the heart stops at birth...

Week 35, advice: People may tell you how beautiful you look, but some women can struggle to accept this. As your weight increases over the months, you may feel negative and struggle to recognise yourself. You might be wondering why your bum's getting bigger when baby is in your belly...

36th week of pregnancy

Week 36, Mum's health: Even if your due date has been calculated through blood tests, ultrasound scans and clever formulas, it's very likely that you won't give birth on that exact date! The due date is just an estimate because nature is at work: your body and your baby will decide...

Week 36, baby: Your baby is almost ready to be born. Some of the organs function more or less normally; others still have a few more weeks' development to go (even after the birth). The heart and lungs will become fully functional in the space of a few seconds after baby is born...

Week 36, advice: 7 out of 10 mums-to-be suffer from heartburn. It's particularly common during the last trimester of pregnancy and is caused by the hormones relaxing the smooth muscle in your body which can allow acid juices from your stomach to go back up your oesophagus...

37th week of pregnancy

Week 37, Mum's health: You've maybe put on a bit more weight than you'd expected over the last few days. Your hands, and particularly your ankles and feet, all appear swollen. This is mainly due to water retention (oedema)...

Week 37, baby: The fetus is about 45cm long and weighs 2.8kg. The fine, downy hair (lanugo) which covered it now disappears, and a little fat starts to accumulate under the skin. The brain grows particularly rapidly at this stage: it now weighs a little over 300 grams...

Week 37, advice: To help relieve backache and stomachache, or to strengthen the perineum, here are a few yoga-ispired positions that will quickly provide you with relief. Familiarise yourself with these exercises, carry them out slowly and breathe deeply as you do so...

38th week of pregnancy

Week 38, Mum's health: Your due date is fast approaching. Will you have a normal delivery or a Caesarean? Caesarean sections (or C-sections) are quite common (about one in five births). A Caesarean can be decided upon at the last minute to avoid possible complications during a normal delivery...

Week 38, baby: The fetus has less and less space for moving in. It weighs a little under 3kg but this is approximate as the weight varies of course from baby to baby. It won't grow much more now but it will put on weight...

Week 38, advice: The contractions at the start of labour are recognisable because they are both painful and increasingly frequent. Pay attention to their rhythm. For a first child, if the contractions last for at least one minute and if they occur every 5 to 10 minutes, it's time to go...

39th week of pregnancy

Week 39, Mum's health: Your due date is approaching. It's any time now, and a lot of women find that the impending birth weighs on their mind. Over the last few weeks, you have put on quite a lot of weight and will have experienced increased water retention...

Week 39, baby: Your baby now measures about 48cm and weighs 3kg. In utero development is complete, and baby is now ready for the big day. It's time for baby to make an appearance because it's becoming squashed and is unable to move much...

Week 39, advice: Are you hypersensitive and afraid that you won't be able to bear the pain of giving birth? Childbirth is often associated with suffering. Some women don't help, though, by taking delight in exaggerating the suffering they endured during labour...

40th week of pregnancy

Week 40, Mum's health: The big day isn't far away. If at this time you develop certain symptoms such as fever, burning sensations when you go to the toilet, or if you have any excessive discharge, contact your doctor or midwife...

Week 40, baby: Your baby now weighs approximately 3kg and is about 50cm in length. Baby is curled up and fast running out of room, either head first (cephalic presentation) or bottom first (breech presentation). The skull, which is 9...

Week 40, advice: A lot of women are afraid of "not being up to it", a fear that is fuelled by a prevailing view that women always have to be perfect. But we have the right to not be perfect 100% of the time! Some women are also worried that their partner will see them in a different light when they give birth...

41th week of pregnancy

Week 41, Mum's health: You have arrived at term, but when should you head to hospital? When the contractions become stronger, increase in duration, become closer together (every 5 to 10 minutes). Also, if you are struggling...

Week 41, baby: At around 50cm in length and 3 to 3.5kg in weight, baby is ready to come out into the world. If you deliver vaginally, baby will make a series of movements in order to descend and slide across your pelvis...

Week 41, advice: How do you imagine your first contact with your child will be? If everything goes well during the delivery, you will be able to hold baby straightaway, the eyes will probably be wide open and looking at you...

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