Christopher Kane - London Fashion Week S/S 2011

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Christopher Kane

Catwalk shows
Round-up: DAY ONE
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Round-up 3 Round-up: DAY THREE
Round-up 3 Round-up: DAY FOUR
Round-up 3 Round-up: DAY FIVE
Round-up 3 Round-up: DAY SIX

Christopher Kane - London Fashion Week S/S 2011


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Christopher Kane - London Fashion Week S/S 2011 © GRUBER/FWDPHOTOS/SIPA - Christopher Kane - London Fashion Week S/S 2011
Christopher Kane - London Fashion Week S/S 2011 © GRUBER/FWDPHOTOS/SIPA
Christopher Kane

London Fashion Week - Spring/Summer 2011
Christopher Kane on net-a-porter

What the press said:

'Christopher Kane took his inspiration from Princess Margaret and by combining conservative hem lines and no frills tailoring with acid neon brights he caused a lurid storm on the runway. Experimental colour was expected from Kane, but his innovative use of lace and leather in the smaller details reminded the fash pack that whilst Kane may like to be crazy with colour the smaller details are where his talent really impresses'.
CK, soFeminine.co.uk

'The color palette, as usual was the main talking point of Christopher Kane's collection. Colours were an explosion of fluorescent bolds and brights. Layering colour on top of more colour Kane created a vivid neon acid toned catwalk collection. (Yes, sunglasses were needed.)'
Catwalk Queen

'The delicate laser-cut holes created a lace look, which was a taste of things to come. Kane paired skirts of green and orange with argyll knit jumpers and twinsets - a nod to his ongoing support of the Scottish wool industry. But before it got too preppy, he pulled it back and showed neon yellow dresses in intricate fine lace.'
Kay Barron, Grazia

'Overall, the lines were sedate, with pleated skirts, drop-waist dresses in lace with pleats and piping, and a very effective final group of embroidered lace.The show’s striking element was laser-cut leather, so supple that it resembled lace. (Or, in its pattern, fancy 1940s linoleum, the designer offered.)'
Cathy Hoyrn, New York Times