Home / Beauty / Skin care / Does Toothpaste Really Work On Spots? We Asked The Experts

Does Toothpaste Really Work On Spots? We Asked The Experts

Pascale Day Published by Pascale Day
Published on 8 February 2017

Gigi Hadid swears by it. Amanda Seyfried is a fan. But does putting toothpaste on your spots really rid your skin of those pesky blemishes? We spoke to two expert dermatologists to determine once and for all if there's any truth behind one of the most commonly perpetuated beauty rumours.

We'll do anything to get rid of spots. In fact, we have tried anything and everything to get rid of spots - from sweeping a roller covered in spikes all over our faces to even cutting cheese out of our diets (those were a dark couple of months). But there's one little trick that we all come back to time and time again, and that's toothpaste.

No one quite knows the science behind it, and it's never been formally recommended to us by a skincare professional, but rather mothers and girlfriends who offer it as a solution when you're complaining about a flare-up. So, why do we trust that the toothpaste to solve all our skin gripes, and does it actually work?

We spoke with Dr. Stefanie Williams, Medical Director at Eudelo, to help us figure out once and for all whether toothpaste really has the ability to give us clear skin - and I'm afraid it's bad news, ladies: "I would not recommend using toothpaste on spots," Stephanie says. "Toothpaste is a '‘wash-off’ product, not a ‘leave-on’ product. It may irritate the skin and its effectiveness on spots isn’t great."

throwback coffee break @patrickta @jennifer_yepez 🌻

A photo posted by Gigi Hadid (@gigihadid) on Feb 4, 2017 at 5:27pm PST

Cadogen Clinic's Consultant Dermatologist Dr Alexis Granite, who specialises in women's dermatology, concurs: "I would avoid using household ingredients such as toothpaste, lemon, baking powder and salt on spots; they are harsh on the skin, disrupting the pH balance and may​ cause irritation and ​sensitivity."

So what would be an effective substitute for all of you who worship the minty stuff? Stephanie has a couple of recommendations: "Get a benzoyl peroxide cream or topical antibiotic from your GP and apply that on spots." Benzoyl peroxide comes in a cream or gel form, and can be brought over the counter at places like Superdrug, and is great for treating acne. If you're looking for something a bit more natural, though, Alexis suggests that honey could be helpful in treating spots because it has healing properties and is a natural antibacterial. And for ya'll who can afford to splash out on some fancy schmancy honey, Manuka is particularly good quality with high antioxidant properties.

When it comes to choosing cosmetics for your skin, Stephanie also adds that there are certain things you should steer clear of: "You should avoid any lipid-rich moisturisers, foundations and oily/creamy cleansers in acne prone skin! I see a lot of patients in clinic, who’s acne is simply caused by the wrong type of skincare."

So there you have it ladies - now go wash that Colgate of your chin!

Have any other great tips for getting rid of spots? Let us know! @sofeminineUK

You might also like...

This Non-Surgical Boob Lift Is Everything Your T*ts Could Ever Want

5 Fail-Safe Ways To Rid Your Skin Of Blackheads

​​8 Natural Skin Quenching Masks You Can Make At Home

You might also like

Comments